Shop Mobile More Submit  Join Login
Feather Style by Spikeheila Feather Style by Spikeheila
In the same vein as Wings of Nope.

Listed are various styles of some kind of deinonychosaur.


Almost all animals portrayed in this chart can happen for one reason or another naturally. Naked faced and naked head and necked dinosaurs occur now, and would've likely done so in the past as well. The Nopes are more of a 'this is not how ALL deinonychosaurs looked', which some people seem to actually think,for one reason or another. Variation happens and, even within the same genus, it's possible to have wildly different feathers or baldness(On the head and neck).


Row 1-

In the first row, the first listed is the template for the rest. It is completely naked. This is how the media (JP) portrays their raptors.
yes, the raptors in JP are naked, NOT scaly.


Row 2-
Here we have a list of peculiar stereotypical raptors, from those who may have used a skeleton as a reference, but didn't research integument(body covering).



The first one is a very very common occurance, it is known as 'shrink-wrapping' and is usually played off as 'i did my research' as far as the shape of the skull goes(this is often not the case however), OR is used to just give extra detail to the skin. The real animal wouldn't likely have the holes in the skull showing extensively, unless they were starved to death. Some people even make the holes in the skull show THROUGH the feathers, that's crazy!

The second is the JP3 or Talon(from Primal Rage) style, where the raptor has a few feathers stuck to the top of it's head, maybe a couple on the arms and tail too. This is the equivalent, in raptors, as having full blown and horrific mange.

The first two may also be drawn by people who 'don't believe' in feathered dinosaurs, often equating them with chickens.. despite there being many many cool and badass avian dinosaurs around today, like the harpy eagle!



The third image is what is commonly seen in what people call'half-bird' dinosaurs like archeopteryx. They don't see birds but as weird feathery lizards, and this style reflects that. Some dinosaurs may have actually had naked heads, for a variety of reasons, however, much like vultures or turkies do.

Fourth is about the same as the third


Row 3-
This row are styles commonly used by artists that know how to feather the dinosaurs in a plausible and reasonable way.

There's actually not much to say on them, and the possibilities are nearly endless, especially depending on style.


Row 4-

The major fluff and 'go crazy' row. These are all fairly plausible in some line of deinonychosaur and is seen in modern day avians
The first imagine is a raptor with owl-like feathers

The second is one with thin whisker-like feathers and eyebrow crests

the third is one whose feathers form a shape like that of a pigeon.

This row has seemingly infinite possibilities and is the most fun.
Add a Comment:
 
:icongwan-thewi:
Gwan-Thewi Featured By Owner Nov 23, 2013
what if i draw mine like the one on the last row, but i leave the muzzle more exposed?
Reply
:iconspikeheila:
Spikeheila Featured By Owner Nov 23, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
That's fine. Feather and featherlessness can vary anyways. This was just a general reference.
Reply
:icongwan-thewi:
Gwan-Thewi Featured By Owner Nov 23, 2013
i just want my dinos to be fairly accurate, and you know what you're doing
Reply
:iconorionide5:
Orionide5 Featured By Owner Oct 6, 2013
I think large species in hot, exposed environments would be fine with row 2, numbers 3 and 4. Also, you didn't touch on a common one--both in paleoart and modern real life--where the feathers stop just after the eyes.
Reply
:iconghostinthepines:
GhostInThePines Featured By Owner Aug 22, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer

I don't know about others, but I've never liked medium-to-large deinonychosaurs depicted with feathering around their mouths or extensive head plummage. People who do this seem to not understand the main reason why most vulture species have bald heads - to eliminate hygiene issues associated with often having to stick their heads into carcasses while feeding. Feathers, while stronger than mammalian hair in most cases, do not take well to bacteria and tend to rot away if not cleaned properly.

 

Most people try to come up with explanations of larger deinonychosaurs hunting young animals or prey smaller than themselves (such as occurs with modern raptors and owls), but considering they lived in a world where they were literally surrounded by giants, I don't see much sense in this argument. Very few African predators will pass up a chance to scavenge a meal from a dead elephant, hippo, giraffe, or various other mega fauna. Why would such habits have been any different for Mesozoic predators?

 

Reply
:iconblazze92:
bLAZZE92 Featured By Owner Edited Feb 9, 2015
That vultures have bald heads for hygiene reasons has always been an assumption that has never been tested as far as I know, the feathers in giant petrels don't seem to rot when covered in blood ibc.lynxeds.com/files/pictures… and in fact most old world vultures don't have naked heads.

The actual reason seems to be a thermoregulatory adaptation to cope with the extreme temperature change when going from hot low altitude air to cold high altitude air. 
www.gla.ac.uk/news/archiveofne…
Reply
:iconghostinthepines:
GhostInThePines Featured By Owner Feb 13, 2015  Hobbyist Photographer
The thermo-regulation argument doesn't work when comparing New World vultures to other New World raptors. Eagles and hawks in North America soar at the same heights as vultures, particularly during migration season, and make the same descents from high to low altitude when hunting during migration. If the flights are the same in altitude, then why would one group need to "go bald" in order to regulate temperatures while the other did not?

Another thing about New World vultures... the northern species migrate according to daily temperatures. As long as the high temps for the day are enough to allow carcasses to thaw out for consumption, they won't leave even if there's snowfall at night. If the lack of head feathering is about thermo-regulation, I would think they wouldn't be able to take the cold.

There's also the fact that the North American New World vultures don't have the additional bald patches that Old World vultures tend to have.

P.S. in response to your petrel comparison: Petrels are seabirds whereas vultures are not. Their feathers have additional adaptations against moisture that vultures and other non-waterbirds/waterfowl do not possess.
Reply
:iconblazze92:
bLAZZE92 Featured By Owner Edited Feb 13, 2015
Why don't you read the article that I linked? and here's the publication: www.sciencedirect.com/science/… and Darren Naish's article on the subject scienceblogs.com/tetrapodzoolo… instead of using my rather brief invitation to read the article as if that was all the argument in its enterity, did you actually even read the first link? first and second paragraphs give me the idea that you didn't.  

btw I'd like to see sources for several of the claims you make, like feathers rotting if left unclean or giant petrels having specialized moisture resistant feathers that guard them against constantly leaving their heads covered in blood and guts.
Reply
:iconspikeheila:
Spikeheila Featured By Owner Aug 22, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Yeah, and it's possible some other deinonychosaurs may have had bald faces or heads. OR they could've had fully feathered heads like most eagles and hawks, which I think is more likely.

Larger deinonychosaurs most likely DID attack smaller prey,or weaker prey, however predators will generally do whatever they want. An animal would rarely pass up a nice and free meal.
Reply
:iconidunnom8:
IDunnoM8 Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
Why do you think it is more likely?
Reply
:icondinodanthetrainman:
dinodanthetrainman Featured By Owner Aug 22, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
The first one in the 2nd row is the worst.
The biodiversity of Ornitholestes deinonychosaurs dromaeosaurs and Troodontids surely didn't move in a straight line to birds and for those of us who are not materialist and do not uphold the world's most popular creation myth the idea of saying if more then one descendant has a trait than the ancestors must also is illogical. Have you found feather impressions for every species of Ornitholestes  deinonychosaurs  dromaeosaurs and Troodontids I think not and in time. You will find that People will look back at the age of bird dinosaurs just as they look back at the age of reptilien dinosaurs.
 Dinosaurs are both unique and diverse! :)
Reply
:iconoaglor:
Oaglor Featured By Owner Aug 22, 2013  Student Traditional Artist
Stupid question, but would this apply to ornithischian quills (ex. Tianyulong)?
Reply
:iconspikeheila:
Spikeheila Featured By Owner Aug 22, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
I don't think we have quite enough information on that yet.
Reply
:iconkegawa:
Kegawa Featured By Owner Aug 21, 2013  Professional Filmographer
heh I may need to go back and tweak my archaeopteryx character. He currently suffers from the bald face syndrome, though tbh depending on how challenging getting feathers on the face of his 3D model is will determine if I change his look. I do dig how the dinos with full facial feathers look though

This is a fantastic reference none the less :)
Reply
:iconqueenserenity2012:
QueenSerenity2012 Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2013
Bald faces aren't impossible. Its scaly ones that don't work. 
Reply
:icondr-xiii:
Dr-XIII Featured By Owner Aug 6, 2014   Digital Artist
Actually, the "shrink-wrap" fails; a bald head and naked neck could work as long as the REST of the body is feathered, like an ostrich.
Reply
:iconmattmart:
MattMart Featured By Owner Aug 21, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
If we're just talking about the head and neck, given the level of variation seen in even closely related modern birds, I think all of these would be at least blue dot, except maybe the one where you can see the skull through the skin...
Reply
:iconspikeheila:
Spikeheila Featured By Owner Aug 21, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Of course. Things like ostriches,cassowaries,and more with 'bald' heads and necks occur for sure, but this is more of a generalized map. Like, how an artist will make -all- deinonychosaurs, even ones we have really really good feather imprints of, will have them as completely bald headed. Naked heads and necks seem to be, at least to me, in the minority so far,from what I've seen and should be an exception, not a rule, for deinonychosaurs.

^^' I've even made a few bald faced or naked throated ones myself, as seen  there  for a basic deinonychosaur, and  here as well, so I'm not fully against them in terms of alternate interpretations and variation on species. I just made this to show that 'raptors' aren't scary feather covered half-lizard freaky monster things.
Reply
:iconraven-amos:
raven-amos Featured By Owner Aug 21, 2013  Professional General Artist
I dunno, I would put the last two at the end of the second "nope" line clearly into the "yes" line based on your own description. Lots of birds have these two styles of facial integument and it seems weird to label them as "nopes/maybes".
Reply
:iconmattmart:
MattMart Featured By Owner Aug 21, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
And based on the one fossil we have, it looks like at least one known non-avialan dino (Beipiaosaurus) has either 3 or 4 in row 2.
Reply
:iconraven-amos:
raven-amos Featured By Owner Aug 21, 2013  Professional General Artist
!!!!! Really? Is it in the published literature yet?
Reply
:iconmattmart:
MattMart Featured By Owner Aug 21, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
people.eku.edu/ritchisong/554i…

You can see the feathers appear to start behind the dentary on the lower jaw, and behind the eye on the top of the skull.
Reply
:iconraven-amos:
raven-amos Featured By Owner Aug 21, 2013  Professional General Artist
The image is pretty low-res, but I think I see what you mean. Is there a paper about this in JVP somewhere...?
Reply
Add a Comment:
 
×




Details

Submitted on
August 21, 2013
Image Size
194 KB
Resolution
1200×1016
Link
Thumb
Embed

Stats

Views
2,460
Favourites
64 (who?)
Comments
23
Downloads
6
×